Acts of Kindness
The WASP’s are the brave women aviators of WWII and their stories are remarkable
People today have a hard time believing women ever flew in WWII. These images set the record straight.
Michael Dabu
05.15.21

“There was never a good war, or a bad peace.” – Benjamin Franklin

World War 2 is by far the most chaotic collision between nations that occurred on a devastatingly global scale.

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According to Wikipedia:

“World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, resulting in 70 to 85 million fatalities, with more civilians than military personnel killed. Tens of millions of people died due to genocides (including the Holocaust), starvation, massacres, and disease. In the wake of the war, Germany and Japan were occupied, and war crimes tribunals were conducted against German and Japanese leaders.”

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When we talk about WW2, it always features the brave men soldiers who fought for the liberty of their respective countries. But little do we know, a lot of courageous women had also risked their lives during the war.

Introducing the fearless Women Airforce Service Pilots or WASPs.

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The WASPs were established on August 5, 1943 out of two different groups.

The Women Auxiliary Ferrying Squadron (WAFS), and the Women’s Flying Training Detachment (WFTDs). Each group was lead by Nancy Love and Jackie Cochran, respectively.

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Prior to the creation of WASP, WAFS, and WFTD were swarmed by 25,000 women applicants. In order to qualify, one must have a civilian pilot’s license. After the thorough screening, only 1,102 made it into these programs.

They’re trained to fly all types of aircraft that were manufactured during World War 2.

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“After their training, the WASP were stationed at 122 air bases across the U.S., where they assumed numerous flight-related missions, and relieved male pilots for combat duty. Ferrying planes from factory to airbases made up the first duties of the WASP. During World War II, women pilots flew 80 percent of all ferrying missions. They delivered over 12,000 aircraft. WASP freed around 900 male pilots for combat duty during World War II.”

Despite their bravery and contributions, their existence was left in the shadows.

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In total, 38 WASP members perished while in service.

One member named Gertrude Tompkins unknowingly disappeared while carrying out a ferry mission. None of them received military honors or services during their funerals. They also didn’t receive any benefits after rendering their military services.

The WASPs were disbanded on December 20, 1944. Sadly, members of the group were given no military standings as they were considered mere civilians.

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Thankfully, in 2010, its members were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal by former US President Barack Obama. Because of their bravery during World War 2, they’ve also been given veteran status.

They are no longer shadows of the war and their efforts have finally been recognized.

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Empowering women.

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The mighty women of WASP shouldn’t be discredited with everything they’ve done for their country.

From the training up to being involved in the actual war, they had shed enough sweat and blood just to prove their worth as parts of the military force.

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The WASP, WAFS, WFTD, all these women’s contributions will never be forgotten. It definitely started the involvement of their gender not only in World War 2 but also in the military forces and other services of the current generation.

Watch the video below to know more about the mighty women of the WASP and see their incredible photos!

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

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By Michael Dabu
hi@sbly.com
Michael Dabu is a contributor at SBLY Media.
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