Inspiring

Grocery Store Sign Explains Reason For Slow Checkout

September 18th, 2020

The supermarket is one of those unusual places where people find their peace. Walking around with a cart, choosing each brand per item carefully is heaven for a lot of men and women. So much to choose from! It’s a sort of escape from reality, odd as that sounds.

That is until they get to the cashier to pay for their groceries and see a long line of people waiting their turn. Who likes waiting in line? They are such a waste of time. There’s so much to do!

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Pixabay Source: Pixabay

Tesco thought otherwise.

In the town of Forres, situated on the north of Scotland on the Moray coast, this Tesco branch has a “slow” checkout lane. They call it their “Relaxed Checkout” where people are free to take as much time as they want during their transaction.

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Facebook Screenshot Source: Facebook Screenshot

Free from the anxiety of rushing and the embarrassment of holding everyone up, you can actually dawdle about while paying for your groceries. Talk to the cashier, play a game on your phone, and even rush back if you forgot that can of tomato sauce!

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Facebook Screenshot Source: Facebook Screenshot

There’s even a sign.

There’s actually a wonderful side to this strange idea. For the elderly who aren’t as spirited in their movements, who may even suffer from dementia or Alzheimer’s. For the depressed and the lonely, and even the stressed and tired, this is the line for them.

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Facebook Screenshot Source: Facebook Screenshot

The idea is from Alzheimer Scotland.

The relaxed checkout lane is currently available every Tuesday and Wednesday morning and is staffed by cashiers trained by Alzheimer Scotland.

Customer assistant, Kerry Speed shares,

“We have people with social anxiety issues, depression, autism, learning difficulties, or basically just a mum with three kids that might want to take it easy when she gets to the checkout.”

They are very thoughtful folk.

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Pixabay Source: Pixabay

Wendy Menzies of Alzheimer Scotland says,

“Just by giving people a little but more time at the checkout can help people and having somebody that understands some of the problems that people who are living with dementia and their carers might be facing can be so supportive for them.”

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Pixabay Source: Pixabay

Patience is a virtue.

It has to be said. There are people in line who do not have the decency to wait their turn. And the worst ones are those who make others feel their impatience. Well let’s hope they find themselves at this Tesco.

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Pexels Source: Pexels

What a thoughtful way of reaching out to others. It’s such a fast paced world that even supermarkets are all about that rush culture. Sometimes, it’s a great idea to slow down and take some time to appreciate the simple things in life. You never know what that cashier is going through so strike up a conversation.

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Facebook Screenshot Source: Facebook Screenshot

Special training.

The checkout staff at this relaxed lane are really trained to identify any special needs of their customers so they can operate at a speed that best suits them. It’s basically giving the customers the confidence they need to go about their groceries.

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Pexels Source: Pexels

And so far, it’s been receiving positive feedback from customers. Life is stressful enough as it is for the healthy. Imagine what it’s like for the elderly and those who suffer from mental health issues. Such an awesome idea. Remember to relax!

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Pexels Source: Pexels

See the story of this relaxed checkout lane in the video below!

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

Tesco introduces 'slow' checkout lane for vulnerable shoppers

A branch of Tesco has launched a 'relaxed' checkout lane to make life a little less stressful for people with dementia and other vulnerable people. More: bbc.in/2iC9fZs

Posted by BBC Scotland News on Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Source: Facebook, Inspire More

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