Life

Authorities Enter Home Of Hoarder Living There for Four Decades

November 7th, 2019

Part of having a home typically means you have to clean and care for it. Yet, for one man in California, he went 40 years letting his condo build-up with disgusting trash.

Inside Edition accompanied a team of specialists as they cleaned up the hoarder’s residence, collecting footage that’s making stomachs churn. In fact, what they discovered is so unbelievable that the story’s been sweeping the internet (no pun intended).

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Everyone has their own standards in regards to cleanliness. But even those who aren’t too bothered by a mess – usually at least take the garbage out every once in a while.

Just for a moment, try envisioning not taking out your home’s trash for a year… Now, imagine not doing so for four decades.

It’s believed that the Lawndale man didn’t clean his condo once in forty years. That’s why, before Inside Edition even walked into the two-bedroom residence, they were forced to put on protective suits.

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Within the home, garbage and unusable items were piled high, feet off the floor. There wasn’t a single room or area not covered in filth, debris, and personal belongings.

The company Steri-Clean (who takes on extreme hoarding cases) was brought in to help. While cleaning they noticed the place was infested with spiders, roaches, and silverfish.

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After four decades of not throwing any items away, it was almost like a time capsule inside.

Hanging on the wall was a 1980s milk poster that featured a young Heather Locklear. They also found an old Sports Illustrated swimsuit calendar that was from the same time frame.

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The team discovered a needle in a haystack.

During the project, the homeowner requested that they look for his birth certificate. Although it seems like it would be an impossible task – they amazingly located the document. And believe it or not, it was somehow in great condition.

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Every room was a health hazard, to say the least. But there was one thing in particular they found that could make your skin crawl.

The homeowner, who had diabetes, never disposed of his used syringes. In the video, they captured footage of the dangerous mess.

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Simply getting a glimpse into a hoarding situation on TV can be jaw-dropping on its own. However, there are many people that deal with the situation in real life.

According to the International OCD Foundation website, approximately 2-6% of people suffer from what’s known as Hoarding Disorder.

They also say:

“Around 75% of individuals who have HD have a co-occurring mental health condition. The most common co-occurring disorders are major depressive disorder, social anxiety disorder/social phobia, and generalized anxiety disorder.”

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The neighbors of the man were completely outraged by his hazardous living situation. But what led to changes finally being made is when he was discovered unconscious from the fumes.

According to Inside Edition, he was taken away in an ambulance. Since then, he’s been residing in an assisted living facility.

Steri-Clean worked tirelessly to get the condo cleaned out after decades of acquiring filth. However, it’s going to be a huge job to get the place in a rentable condition.

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YouTube Screenshot Source: YouTube Screenshot

After the news report was uploaded online it gathered more than 300,000 views in just a few days. It may not be something everyone’s been exposed to – but it’s an eye-opening reminder that it’s the reality for many.

Press play below to see the shocking footage for yourself.

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

Source: Inside Edition, International OCD Foundation

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